Advise for spirited drives.

RSRowe

Paid Member
I still stand by my point regardless of what you say.
I’m not trying to be a twat..... I just am a twat.

People have taken the time here to write lengthy replies, and you’ll read them and still carry on what you’re doing. Unfortunately for you, statistics don’t lie.

You’re best off just trying to get the most of it out your system. If you’re lucky you will get away with it, if you don’t you’ll likely end up hurting yourself and or other people. It’s only then you’ll realise how much of a widger you’ve been

I had a 300+ bhp Focus at the age of 19. I was a nob in it most of the time. But generally I’d only drive like a pleb where the risk to other people was reduced. Even then, a lot of the shit I did then could of ended badly.


Book a trackday and drive like a weapon where you’re actually allowed to drive like a weapon.
 

joehodges154

Gold Member
This has been a massive eye opener and I want to thank everyone who has replied. Very wise words from people with experience of being a young boy racer on the roads has been very handy. Will definitely look at booking a novice track day this summer.
I still stand by my point regardless of what you say.
I’m not trying to be a twat..... I just am a twat.

People have taken the time here to write lengthy replies, and you’ll read them and still carry on what you’re doing. Unfortunately for you, statistics don’t lie.

You’re best off just trying to get the most of it out your system. If you’re lucky you will get away with it, if you don’t you’ll likely end up hurting yourself and or other people. It’s only then you’ll realise how much of a widger you’ve been

I had a 300+ bhp Focus at the age of 19. I was a nob in it most of the time. But generally I’d only drive like a pleb where the risk to other people was reduced. Even then, a lot of the shit I did then could of ended badly.


Book a trackday and drive like a weapon where you’re actually allowed to drive like a weapon.
I don't disvalue your opinion what so ever. Expressing my honesty in my original post was always going to be met with a bit of backlash, as I openly stated I drive like a nob, but that's when you get the best advice and opinons out of people. I am looking to make a change and settle my driving on the roads, as @IainMac says, I'm young and have the best part of my life still to come. Hopefully you'll see that my actions will speak louder than text on a forum.
 

LiamP

Paid Member
Agree with the others, get on a track, it changes the way you drive on the road (for me anyway) there is no point pushing it on public roads as you quite simply can’t in comparison without risking a cyclist or unaware driver pushing you into a ditch.

Have a look at opentrack as Dave offers free tuition on the day (strongly recommend for your first run) Brands Hatch isn’t far from Surrey but its not for novices due to the length (very busy) and technical, Bedford is supposedly good due to run off/cheap (never been) and there is Goodwood or Thruxton which are both nice and quick. Goodwood might seem expensive but I got over 1hr 30 of track time with lots of space and as you probably saw from my clip I still have a smile on my face but no brakes or tyres left :grin:

+ if it wasn’t for COVID I would let you come out with me / maybe get a quick drive on a suitable track day to give you a taste, maybe soon:sunglasses:
 

joehodges154

Gold Member
Agree with the others, get on a track, it changes the way you drive on the road (for me anyway) there is no point pushing it on public roads as you quite simply can’t in comparison without risking a cyclist or unaware driver pushing you into a ditch.

Have a look at opentrack as Dave offers free tuition on the day (strongly recommend for your first run) Brands Hatch isn’t far from Surrey but its not for novices due to the length (very busy) and technical, Bedford is supposedly good due to run off/cheap (never been) and there is Goodwood or Thruxton which are both nice and quick. Goodwood might seem expensive but I got over 1hr 30 of track time with lots of space and as you probably saw from my clip I still have a smile on my face but no brakes or tyres left :grin:

+ if it wasn’t for COVID I would let you come out with me / maybe get a quick drive on a suitable track day to give you a taste, maybe soon:sunglasses:
Sounds class mate, I'll give opentrack a quick google, I'll take you up on that offer if it ever comes around :thumb:
 

suj

Paid Member
Like @LiamP said, Bedford is a great track when starting out (not just for starting out, we used to use to as a "shakedown" if we did new mods), it's open, it's flat, has some faster sections and slower, most importantly has loads of run off and no close barriers, so if you do go off you'll most likely spin and then can get back on safely with no big problems (maybe some mud rash on the side of the car).
 

Sean197

RIP Albi :(
Moderator
Two further points to expand on what I said about trackdays and also 'time and place' for driving quickly:
1. For fuck sake DO NOT ever get involved with someone who wants to race you on a public road. That's an instant ban and things can get out of hand very quickly. I used to be terrible for not just lifting off and letting the knobhead overtake, whereas now I just brush it off (it does take practice and a lot of self control but it's worth it).
2. When doing a trackday, try not to come straight off the track and drive home, otherwise you might find your driving is a little 'brisk'. Have a coffee or bite to eat etc. before heading off to give your body a chance to get rid of the adrenaline.

On a side note, It's good to see the advice being taken on board, or at least not dismissed out of hand, and it's also nice to see you not being flamed and members giving actual mature helpful advice. :thumb: :french:
 

Beany

Platinum Member
Two further points to expand on what I said about trackdays and also 'time and place' for driving quickly:
1. For fuck sake DO NOT ever get involved with someone who wants to race you on a public road. That's an instant ban and things can get out of hand very quickly. I used to to be terrible for not just lifting off and letting the knobhead overtake, whereas now I just brush it off (it does take practice and a lot of self control but it's worth it).
2. When doing a trackday, try not to come straight off the track and drive home, otherwise you might find your driving is a little 'brisk'. Have a coffee or bite to eat etc. before heading off to give your body a chance to get rid of the adrenaline.
On a side note, It's good to see the advice being taken on board, or at least not dismissed out of hand, and it's also nice to see you not being flamed and members giving actual mature helpful advice. :thumb: :french:
Makes a change :200T:
 

joehodges154

Gold Member
Two further points to expand on what I said about trackdays and also 'time and place' for driving quickly:
1. For fuck sake DO NOT ever get involved with someone who wants to race you on a public road. That's an instant ban and things can get out of hand very quickly. I used to be terrible for not just lifting off and letting the knobhead overtake, whereas now I just brush it off (it does take practice and a lot of self control but it's worth it).
2. When doing a trackday, try not to come straight off the track and drive home, otherwise you might find your driving is a little 'brisk'. Have a coffee or bite to eat etc. before heading off to give your body a chance to get rid of the adrenaline.

On a side note, It's good to see the advice being taken on board, or at least not dismissed out of hand, and it's also nice to see you not being flamed and members giving actual mature helpful advice. :thumb: :french:
I have noticed, as I'm sure this is the case with others, but driving a "sporty" or "boy racer" car, other road users do like to entice a race situation, coming back from my remap last month I had a group of lads in an Audi S5 driving next to me around the M25 not overtaking, just sitting there looking over, I gave them a downshift and a small pull, but only because I was coming off at the next junction.

Thank you Sean. Everyone is entitled to an opinion, that's why I made the thread, I want to hear it from all sides, would love to have asked the old man for advice but he'd take my keys from me! Weird as it sounds but I feel very welcome on here to express issues and ask for advice. Positive or negative replies are always welcome.

On a side note, don't want to get too comfortable, but when will the meets start again? I would happily drive a few hours to go to a clio197.net meet or drive out! Have been reading old threads of organising events and I am looking forward to covid blowing over. :thumb:
 
  • Like
Reactions: Sean197 and Beany

lewishunter98

Paid Member
Like @LiamP said, Bedford is a great track when starting out (not just for starting out, we used to use to as a "shakedown" if we did new mods), it's open, it's flat, has some faster sections and slower, most importantly has loads of run off and no close barriers, so if you do go off you'll most likely spin and then can get back on safely with no big problems (maybe some mud rash on the side of the car).
Another vote for Bedford.

I had a spin there & Slid off track, onto the grass and back on to track. Took out a cone & rolled my tyre so got a bit of "Curb rash"

Makes you think though, had that been on the road it could have been terrible. I definitely slowed it down on the roads since doing a couple track days.

All for a little blast still, as I'm sure we all are But well within the limits and always wary of what's round the corner so slow it right down

Sent from my AC2003 using Tapatalk
 

link

Paid Member
I also ride a bike so I'll layout one simple piece of advice... If you can't see, you don't know. Whether that's around a bend or hiding behind a tree, there's always something lurking out there ready to kill you... Or worse, somebody else. :sob:

Like most people we've all had out "spirited drives" and "oh f*ck" moments, sometimes it's your own fault, other times your a victim. The more you get away with the more your confidence grows until wham your upside down in ditch bleeding out your eyeballs, your car is written off, your passenger is dead, your arrested for dangerous driving, your licence is gone, your insurance is sky high, your name is all over the papers, you've lost your job, and oh yeah you ran over a small girl who was walking her dog... Ask yourself, was it worth it? :pensive:

These cars do attract attention, not long after I got mine some dick in an M135 was all over my arse for about half an hour desperate to overtake and cock woft about how he did a 197... Just let them go by, who looks the real tosser? :smile:

The fact you can even have a "spirited drive" is a luxury, speed cameras are everywhere and dash cams in every other vehicle. You'd be banged to rights will all the digital evidence, even this message on a public forum could be used against you! :grin:

As everyone has said, do it on track... Where there's huge run off areas and first aiders standing by to give you a band aid. Also, ask yourself why your old man would give you a hard time? Maybe he doesn't want to see you in a pine box?? :cry:
 
Last edited:

joehodges154

Gold Member
I also ride a bike so I'll layout one simple piece of advice... If you can't see, you don't know. Whether that's around a bend or hiding behind a tree, there's always something lurking out there ready to kill you... Or worse, somebody else. :sob:

Like most people we've all had out "spirited drives" and "oh f*ck" moments, sometimes it's your own fault, other times your a victim. The more you get away with the more your confidence grows until wham your upside down in ditch bleeding out your eyeballs, your car is written off, your passenger is dead, your arrested for dangerous driving, your licence is gone, your insurance is sky high, your name is all over the papers, you've lost your job, and oh yeah you ran over a small girl who was walking her dog... Ask yourself, was it worth it? :pensive:

These cars do attract attention, not long after I got mine some dick in an M135 was all over my arse for about half an hour desperate to overtake and cock woft about how he did a 197... Just let them go by, who looks the real tosser? :smile:

The fact you can even have a "spirited drive" is a luxury, speed cameras are everywhere and dash cams in every other vehicle. You'd be banged to rights will all the digital evidence, even this message on a public forum could be used against you! :grin:

As everyone has said, do it on track... Where there's huge run off areas and first aiders standing by to give you a band aid. Also, ask yourself why your old man would give you a hard time? Maybe he doesn't want to see you in a pine box?? :cry:
Yes very true, his first car was a mk1 astra GTE so I'm sure he'll understand where I am coming from, but a bollocking will still come my way.
 

papa

Paid Member

It's not cheap, but neither are trackdays and it is 1-2-1 driver tuition on the road.

Had good write ups from some driving journalists (think it was in evo magazine a few years ago) and will more likely improve your understanding and ability to drive on the road than destroying your tyres on a track day using the same techniques that saw you run wide (entry speed, throttle application, steering input etc)



This is a good way to learn transferable driving skills with exercises on braking, steering and cornering. I was lucky to do one of these training days at Blyton a few years ago, think they only do at North Weald now. The organiser is an ex-F1 test driver who has degrees in driving and started the courses after friends dying on the road, to improve peoples ability to drive on the road. I continue to use the techniques learned, both on road and track, well recommended!



There's also Advanced Driving, which is a more traditional approach and again is designed to improve your safety and ability on the road.


Other driver tuition organisations are available! Some insurance companies give you discounts for doing the above
 
  • Like
Reactions: joehodges154

NickD

Gold Member
Lots of sage advice here and yes, the very vast majority of us went a bit wild when we first learned to drive. It is good advice to take speed to a race track, but as the post above this say, it is road skills that you also need as road driving is so different to the race track. I am very involved with R3 https://www.r3roadriskreduction.co.uk/ which is worth a subscribe if nothing else. I am equally aware that regardless of what has been said in this thread about the dangers of road driving is going to have little affect once you get back into a car and so what is needed is better knowledge.
  • First thing, read the road signs! We have some very poignant video's where drivers have got serious trouble by just ignoring information around them. Road narrows, bridge, junction and everything else. The more signs there are the more hazard. In many rural settings the black and white chevrons for bends only get put up after a serious accident. If they have a yellow background there is a high chance it is the scene of a fatality.
  • Next read the road and the focal point where the while lines at the side of the road (if there are any) converge. On a straight road they will be way in the distance. As the road bends that point will become far closer. If it is coming closer to you in a bend, the bend is tightening and you should be slowing. If it is moving further away the the bend is opening and you can use more speed. The police call it "chasing the white rabbit."
  • Most importantly in any driving look ahead, eyes of full beam, not dipped, looking just in front of the car. Desperately important on rural roads, look at the line of trees, telegraph poles, hedges. If the road looks straight, but there is a tree in front of you in the distance, the road ain't straight.
  • Understand the weather. If it is pissing with rain, grip is far less, if it is nice and warm and sunny, expect there to be people on bikes, pedestrians and "stuff!" IMAG0257.jpg
  • And finally, understand the dynamics of your car. The energy in your car goes up with square of your speed. Meaning it will take you twice as long to stop from 70mph as it does from 50mph which can be very important on roads you don't know and rural roads. Equally, you hit someone with twice the force at 42mph as you do at 30mph. People think it is no big thing to go a "bit faster" in 30's. They are there fore a reason, respect them.
 

Pav

Moderator
I know a lot of the northern meets were held by Jimmy, Chris & @Pav but they’ve gone their own way... most of us now try and get together mostly on track
those were the days..anyway..going tracking your car is the best way to meet new members and also have a great day out
 
  • Like
Reactions: Beany

SimboRS

Paid Member
Lots of good advice on here. It’s very easy to get carried away on the road in any fun car luckily I never had anything fast at your age. My advise would be tone it down on the roads. I find a lot of people don’t drive smoothly possibly because it feels faster/erratic slow it down and drive smoothly and enjoy the car
 
  • Like
Reactions: joehodges154

Dancliovalver

Paid Member
was like you myself once dude, so im not gunna be a hypocrite and say you shouldnt do it, however!, ive found myself as im getting older to be much more cautious of everything on the road, quite often asking myself "what the F@#K was i doing way back when?!?" haha, but i completely agree with the guys on here, am much more chilled out on the roads now, if i have some dickhead up my arse trying to goad me into racing i just slow down even more, cant wait to start having a few more track sessions though, loads of fun! maybe would be cool to get a 197.net track day set up when everything is open again, be nice to meet some of you =)