Spigot rings...

So came to go away on Friday night, filled with fuel and went to pump up the passenger rear. But nothing would go in, it appears the valve is goosed.
Tried the compressor on the other tyres and it was fine.

Not the end of the world, but means I’m going to have to put the TD1.2’s on for abit.

The spigot rings that I got with the car are 67.1mm and the size needed for the hub is 66.1mm. It’s not ideal, but I can’t see 0.5mm making THAT much a difference?

Any ideas?

Thanks
 

Sean197

RIP Albi :( Hello Red 200 :)
Moderator
In theory no as the wheel bolts will centralise the wheel fine, and most spigot rings are plastic anyway so hardly load-bearing.
 
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suj

Paid Member
In theory no as the wheel bolts will centralise the wheel fine, and most spigot rings are plastic anyway so hardly load-bearing.
The spigot is to keep shearing forces off the bolts, as they are not designed to take these, so getting the correct spigot size is important, maybe not straight away but over time it will.

I went over it in a previous reply to a thread (I made a guide on other forums before).
 

Sean197

RIP Albi :( Hello Red 200 :)
Moderator
The spigot is to keep shearing forces off the bolts, as they are not designed to take these, so getting the correct spigot size is important, maybe not straight away but over time it will.

I went over it in a previous reply to a thread (I made a guide on other forums before).
ah ok, cool. I've never used them anyway!
 
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NickD

Gold Member
The spigot is to keep shearing forces off the bolts, as they are not designed to take these, so getting the correct spigot size is important, maybe not straight away but over time it will.

I went over it in a previous reply to a thread (I made a guide on other forums before).
No it is not.
The wheel is held in place with the static friction created by the the load or tension supplied by the bolts / nuts. For the spigot ring to do as you say there would need to be relative movement of the wheel against the hub face in operation. if you have this, then you are in trouble. If you have this and hope that a plastic spigot ring will resolve this then you will have issues. Many spigot rings will disintegrate under the the heat of heavy brake use anyway.
Spigot rings help centralise the wheel, particularly if you have a wheel that uses bolts rather than studs and are a great help when mounting a wheel. Washer face bolts or nuts that clamp up on flat faces need a sized spigot to suit the centre hole but conical and spherical seat fasteners do not. You use to be able to find a VOSA test sheet on the internet if you looked hard enough.
Again, the wheel is held static against the hub face by the fasteners under tension at the correct torque and there should be no relative movement between the two in operation. If you have insufficient tension or even missing fixings which allow movement to create cyclic fatigue loading's, or if you over tighten and cause stress cracking then you get issues. If you have painted wheels with paint on the hub face, damage or other sorts of issues they can all cause failures due to irregular loads, relaxation of tension or other issues, but spigot rings wont resolve this.
 

NickD

Gold Member
Don't mean to labour the point, but I supply (and fit) tyres for a living. Some of the stuff I see is very scary. There was a Facebook post recently on a car club page where the vast majority of opinion on tightening wheel nuts was find the longest bar possible and attempt to give yourself a hernia while tightening and then some. Doing this, not just runs the risk of stripping threads, but can take the bolt or stud past the elastic limit but can and will certainly induce cracking in the base of the threads, so the failure may not happen straight away, but is going to. The other end is not tight enough, which is basically not done up. Even one bolt loose puts unacceptable strain on the other fixings and sooner or later there is going to be an issue.
As I am sure you all know, the torque figure for the 197 / 200 is 125 NM and for the 200T 115 NM.
Having once had a trailer lose a wheel (AND HUB), the consequences of a wheel separating from a vehicle a speed are scary. Beyond the damage and possible consequences to you with only 3 wheels on your car, that wheel is also going to hit something and they don't stop till they do.
As an example of the loads wheels take, this is from our car in the recent Citroen C1 24H race at Rockingham.
And this is the link to the VOSA info.

20180513_105601.jpg
 

Micah

Clumsy McButterfingers
Moderator
I bought metal spigot rings for my Sparco's from MTec as I wasn't sure if I'd end up melting the plastic ones supplied! 73.1 - 66.1 is quite a gap to fill, but pleased to say they mounted perfectly. Not sure how the hell you'd find a 1mm spigot ring.
 
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