Front wing vents

Jack Maxwell

Gold Member
These already serve a purpose of extracting hot air from the engine bay. Here is a quote from the original press release:

"The extractors visible on the front wings contribute to the car's aerodynamic performance by neutralising the turbulence produced by the wider wings and play a part in improving the model's CdA. They also facilitate the extraction of hot air from underneath the bonnet, while the vents are angled to channel airflow along the sides of the car for enhanced performance.

Clio Renaultsport 200 is also equipped with an air diffuser, an aerodynamic feature normally only found on high-end sporting cars. Air passing underneath the vehicle is channelled via the flat bottom to the diffuser where it accelerates before being expelled at a higher speed. Combined with the shape of the diffuser, this creates a zone of depression under the car, sucking the chassis to the ground. Compared with a conventional wing, diffusers generate significant downforce without resisting forward movement. On a track, at 80mph, lift is reduced by almost 40kg. The diffuser is designed to function in association with the rear flat bottom which leaves space for the exhaust silencer and lateral-mounted tailpipes."
 

bedoef

Platinum Member
Strange, they look and feel to me like they are closed off. I have to poke my head in the arches next time the car is on the lift.
 

Sean197

RIP Albi :( Hello Red 200 :)
Moderator
These already serve a purpose of extracting hot air from the engine bay. Here is a quote from the original press release:

"The extractors visible on the front wings contribute to the car's aerodynamic performance by neutralising the turbulence produced by the wider wings and play a part in improving the model's CdA. They also facilitate the extraction of hot air from underneath the bonnet, while the vents are angled to channel airflow along the sides of the car for enhanced performance.

Clio Renaultsport 200 is also equipped with an air diffuser, an aerodynamic feature normally only found on high-end sporting cars. Air passing underneath the vehicle is channelled via the flat bottom to the diffuser where it accelerates before being expelled at a higher speed. Combined with the shape of the diffuser, this creates a zone of depression under the car, sucking the chassis to the ground. Compared with a conventional wing, diffusers generate significant downforce without resisting forward movement. On a track, at 80mph, lift is reduced by almost 40kg. The diffuser is designed to function in association with the rear flat bottom which leaves space for the exhaust silencer and lateral-mounted tailpipes."
Been discussed before, when you take the wings off the vents are blocked off and there's nowhere for air to go.
 
Excuse my naivety but surely you won't see the vent coming from the arch of its allowing air to pass through from the engine compartment?

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